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Floaters in vitreous

Diseases

Floaters are small translucent particles that move in the vitreous. Floaters are usually harmless and noticeable by many.

Over time, the vitreous is liquefied and simultaneously the structures from which it is formed are condensed. They begin to move in the dilute vitreous body and are perceived as floating clouds. Patients describe them in a variety of ways: swimming flies, spiders, spiders, black spots, threads, smoke, and so on. The most important thing about them is that they move in the movement of the eye. This is the difference between the vitreous in the vitreous and the macular diseases where the dark spots always stay in the same place.

Dilatation, contraction and secretion of the vitreous from the retina is a normal age process. In most cases this goes without complications. In some people, the vitreous is more tightly connected to the peripheral retina, and when it is shrunk, it pulls up these areas. Just pulling causes a retinal response with “lightning”. Patients see “lightning” in the peripheral field of vision, most often in the evening or on a dark background. If the retina is weaker in a certain area, as a result of its removal from the vitreous, a retinal rupture may occur. When there is a rupture of the retina, there is a great risk of peeling it away. Retinal detachment is the most difficult complication of peeling the vitreous.

If a person has symptoms of vitreous detachment (moving fog, lightning, dirt), it is very important to go to an emergency eye doctor for the eventual discovery of an existing rheological rupture. For this purpose a special mirror lens is used. If the presence of retinal tear is detected, it is imperative to perform laser therapy to “seal” the area around the retinal tear. This “sealing” prevents more serious retinal detachment in 95% of cases.

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